@Godolphin

A collaboration with the West London Apple Regional Training Centre and Godolphin & Latymer School
Shared by Jonathan White

This year in our Apple Regional Training Centre (RTC), we have expanded from a single Teacher Learning Community (TLC) focused specifically on technology, out to a wider range of TLCs with pedagogical focuses where technology will be a contributing factor. I have joined the Assessment TLC, and will occasionally blog here about its activities in order to share our RTC's activities with the wider world. We have begun our program with a chapter from Daisy Christodoulou's recent book, Making Good Progress? The Future of Assessment for Learning. <read full post>

iPad as Visualiser

Shared by Sara Harnett

Sometimes it is difficult for everyone to see what is happening during a science lesson when an experiment is being carried out in the fume cupboard if using dangerous chemicals. One way to overcome this is to use the camera in your iPad. With the camera app open and your iPad displayed on the projector (via cable or Apple TV), simply aim the camera at the experiment and it will show on the big screen. This way everyone can see what is happening from their desk and still be able to take down notes. Even better would be to record it at the same time, and that way you can go back over the experiment to further explain it. Mounting brackets to hold your iPad for you are inexpensive and readily available from online retailers like Amazon.

Shared by Jonathan White

Our Apple Regional Training Centre's Teacher Learning Community met for its last time for this year in late June. Our ongoing goal for this year is to examine the impact of educational technology on the classroom, with a particular focus on how that technology can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. At our June meeting, we discussed the recent guidance report from the Education Edowment Foundation, Using Digital Technology to Improve Learning. In particular, we worked through the summary of recommendations as a source for reflection on our own use of technology for learning, and progress in this field across the school in the past few years.

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Shared by Jonathan White

As we enter exam season, revision is at the top of everyone's mind. Often we find that girls remember some of the quizzes we've run as formative assessment, and wish that they had them to use as revision tools. As Socrative is one of our top tools for this, the solution is easy, if not entirely obvious.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Our Apple Regional Training Centre's Teacher Learning Community met for the fifth time early this May. Our ongoing goal for this year is to examine the impact of educational technology on the classroom, with a particular focus on how that technology can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. At our May meeting, we discussed how we can use audio recording tools to enhance the feedback we give to students. In particular, we looked at the Kaizena tool, which allows detailed audio feedback together with the facility for students to respond to that feedback.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Recently at G&L, there has been some discussion about how pupils might use the iPads as tools for peer assessment. Google Classroom provides us with a way to do this by allowing students to post to the class Stream, and to comment upon others’ posts.

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Shared by Jonathan White

In mid-March, our Apple Regional Training Centre's Teacher Learning Community met for the fourth time. Our ongoing goal for this year is to examine the impact of educational technology on the classroom, with a particular focus on how that technology can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. At our March meeting, we investigated the potential of stop motion animation to improve student learning.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Way back (in tech terms) in 2017, Apple added a great new feature with the release of iOS 11. This feature, screen recording, continues in iOS 12 and gives you the ability to record whatever is happening on your device's screen, in manner of Explain Everything, but built in to iOS so that you can record in any app. Using screen recording, a student can, for example, summarise a topic area while referring to digital resources created or curated in any number of different apps. A teacher can offer verbal feedback on student work in any app, as well.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Hinge questions are multiple-choice questions that have been carefully crafted in such a way that each wrong answer highlights a particular, popular misconception about the topic. Teachers can use these questions at an inflection point in the lesson, e.g. when about to move on to a new part of the topic, to determine if students have kept up and understood, or if a particular misconception needs to be explored and dispelled in greater detail.

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Shared by Jonathan White

At the beginning of February, our Apple RTC Teaching Learning Community met for the third time. Our goal for the year is to examine hte impact of educational technology on the classroom, specifically focusing on how it can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. At our February meeting, our co-chair presented the action research project she carried out last year on video assessments, using the Flipgrid and Recap apps.

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Shared by Jonathan White

In the late 1980's, Derek Bok, then president of Harvard University, established monthly seminars for professors from around the university to examine and improve teaching and learning. As part of this, Prof Frederick Mosteller was inspired by a report on "Minute Paper" assessments (more on these soon!) to trial a series of three short questions asked to his students at the close of a lecture. These were asked several times over the course of the term, but not every lesson.

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Folder Icon

Organise Your Drive

Shared by Jonathan White

As you may know, you can create folders in Google Drive in order to help you organise your work, share collections of resources, set up collaborative spaces for you to share with individual students, etc.. The people over at EdTechTeacher have put together a series of useful how-to videos explaining the creation of folders, managing folders, and moving both folders and files.

http://edtechteacher.org/google-drive-folders/

Shared by Jonathan White

In early December, our Teacher Learning Community met for the second time. Our goal for the year is to examine the impact of educational technology on the classroom, specifically focusing on how it can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. Each meeting is preceded by a some assigned pre-reading. If you're not familiar with TLCs, have a look at the post from our previous meeting for some more general information.

For this meeting, our topic was "Everyone Can Create," and Apple's recent ebooks on teaching and learning with their creative apps were assigned as pre-reading.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Providing structure - making it clear what form you want the work to be completed work to be be in (PDF, Doc, video, etc.) - can be the essential dividing line between a brilliant task and a digital train wreck.

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Shared by Jonathan White

Socrative contains a feature called “Quick Question” that allows you to ask ad hoc questions of your class, collecting responses from all girls rather than only those raising their hands. These can be useful for pairing with existing lesson materials (e.g. questions embedded in an existing PowerPoint presentation), quickly polling the class for confidence with new material, or quick-fire topic revision without needing to prepare a quiz in advance.

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Shared by Jonathan White

For every activity you run in Nearpod, a record of student responses is saved for you to access later. Read further for some information on using Nearpod for spaced retrieval practice, and how the data collected from such practice can be useful (or skip to the last section of this post for nitty gritty of how to do it).

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Shared by Jonathan White

In mid-October, shortly before breaking up for half-term, our Teacher Learning Community met for the first time. Our goal for the year is to examine the impact of educational technology on the classroom, specifically focusing on how it can be used to "redefine" teaching and learning. Each meeting is preceded by a some assigned pre-reading. If you're not familiar with TLCs, below (at the bottom of the page) you can find the presentation about them that I shared with the UK & Ireland's RTC managers and facilitators at our June conference.

For this meeting, our topic was "Revisiting SAMR," and there were two articles assigned for pre-reading ... <read full post>

Dictionary
Shared by Jonathan White

As we all know, developing girls’ vocabulary has been an ongoing focus area at Godolphin & Latymer. This article from the University of Sussex discusses the importance of developing students’ discipline-specific vocabulary for your subject. The article follows with some suggested activities, including building a glossary in the university’s Moodle VLE, Study Direct.

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Microphone
Shared by Jonathan White

The "Sounds Good" project was a JISC-funded project at Leeds Metropolitan University from 2008-2009. While technology has moved on since then, the project did provide some interesting and useful insights on the use of audio as a feedback medium for students from foundation courses up to Ph.D candidates. I think some of the findings are reasonably extensible to sixth-formers and possibly further down in secondary, as well. Overall, the project found that some initial time investment was required by staff, but in the long run audio feedback was able to save some staff time, depending upon factors like their writing and typing speeds and general technological comfort level. Feedback from students was largely qualitative, but overwhelmingly ...

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Explain Everything Classic Logo
Shared by Jonathan White

The Explain Everything screen-casting app is one of the most flexible and powerful in our standard iPad toolkit. By allowing you to import media of almost any kind, and then record voice-over and live annotations, Explain Everything opens up loads of possibilities. I'd like to briefly mention a particularly useful one here: Enhanced Feedback. This has been used successfully in MFL and is being trialed in some other departments.

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Google Slides Icon
Shared by Jonathan White

Did you know that you can embed videos in Google Slides, not only from YouTube and the web, but also from your own Google Drive? Students can now "app smash" their way into supercharged presentations and learning logs, adding their digital products from Explain Everything, stop-motion video apps, iMovie, and more!

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Popplet Logo
Shared by Jonathan White

All of our iPads have on them a very simple mind mapping app called Popplet. This app allows one to create "popples" or bubbles, containing a word, concept, picture, or drawing. You can then draw connections among these to create complex concept maps and diagrams.Mind mapping is one tool that can be usefully employed for retrieval practice. At the start of a lesson, girls can be given a "seed concept" -- the centre bubble -- on the board or verbally (or as an image distributed via Classroom). They then have a few minutes to build a mind map ... <read full post>

iOS Camera App icon

Girls Share It With the Class

Shared by Jonathan White

Here's a really quick idea for you that I've seen in practice already a few times: so that girls can be assured of having an accurate record of something you've created on the whiteboard -- for example, fleshing out a definition, building a mind map, or simply jotting down bullet points -- ask a girl in the front row to quickly snap a photo of the board and post that to Classroom before you wipe it clean. This way, if someone at the back had trouble seeing, or a slow writer hadn't gotten it all down yet, nothing is lost and the girls still have a record of these valuable notes.

The Merchant, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
Shared by Jenny Stevens

The main aim of the lesson was for students to find out about the generic characteristics of the fabliau form and to evaluate how far they were reflected in The Merchant’s Tale.Students were asked to google the term ‘fabliau’ and we then discussed how to recognise academically sound sites from the URL (e.g. looking for ‘ac.uk’ or ‘edu’). Once they’d tracked down and agreed upon a reliable definition, they were asked to break it down into distinct characteristics and to present these in table form (each column headed by a single characteristic). They were then asked to put a tick, cross or question mark to indicate how far The Merchant ...

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